Sardis Verlag

Tabulae-Geographicae.de

Sardis VerlagComment

We have stopped selling our maps directly. If you want to purchase one of our maps of the Ancient World you can use the new platform tabulae-geographicae.de.

Wir haben aufgehört unsere Karten direkt an Endkunden zu Vertreiben. Wenn sie einen hochaufgelösten Druck einer unserer Landkarten der Antiken Welt erwerben möchten haben sie gegenwärtig die Möglichkeit dies über die neue Plattform tabulae-geographicae.de zu tun. Voraussichtlich Ende März werden unsere Produkte auch wieder über Amazon.de verfügbar sein.

New rolled up Roman Empire maps

Michael DitterComment

The largely sold out rolled up Imperium Romanum 211 AD map has again become available from www.Tabulae-Geographicae.de. The new edition features many additions and other improvements compared to our first map, all detailed in the following blogpost on Tabulae-Geographicae.de.

 

Die größtenteils vergriffene Imperium Romanum 211 AD Karte ist ab sofort noch einmal in einer neuen gerollten Edition von www.Tabulae-Geographicae.de verfügbar. In dem neuen Nachdruck konnten viele Ergänzungen vorgenommen und weitere Verbesserungen integriert werden. Details dazu finden sich in folgendem Blogpost auf Tabulae-Geographicae.

Winter Sale on Amazon.com!

Michael DitterComment

All of our maps sold on Amazon.com are now on sale for the remainder of the year and discounted by more than 25 %!

The Roman Empire: Detailed wall map of the entire Roman Empire from Lower Nubia to the Antonine Wall, with surrounding territories in the final years of the reign of Septimius Severus, about 211 CE.

Ancient Egypt: This highly detailed and decorative huge wall map depicts the country and all its dependent territories during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II., the pinnacle of Egyptian power! An ancillary map shows Egypt's neighbors, the other great powers of the time, rivals for the hegemony over the Levant.

The Achaemenid Empire and the West: The map encompasses the entire territory between the Pillars of Hercules and the Indus valley, between the Hallstatt era Celts in central Europe and the legendary kingdom of Saba in southern Arabia. This includes the Persian Empire at its greatest extend during the reign of Dareios I., 522 – 486 BCE.

The Roman Era Orient: Detailed map of Roman era Orient about 64 CE, depicting Roman Syria and the surrounding client states, the entire Parthian Empire, as well as the remaining states of western Asia together with the major trade routes over land and through the Indian ocean.

 

More Maps available on Amazon.com

Sardis VerlagComment

In addition to our Roman Empire map, more of our products have now become available on Amazon.com. While sold for slightly higher prices than directly from our store, for North American customers the combined costs with shipping fees are usually still significantly lower than when ordering from Europe.

Ancient Egypt: Ancient Egypt in the New Kingdom period. This highly detailed and decorative huge wall map in 1:2.5 Mio. scale depicts the country and all its dependent territories during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II., the pinnacle of Egyptian power! An ancillary map in 1:10 Mio. shows Egypt's neighbors, the other great powers of the time, rivals for the hegemony over the Levant.

 

The Achaemenid Empire and the West: Detailed wall map of the ancient world at the transition between the archaic and classical periods of Mediterranean civilization. The map encompasses the entire territory between the Pillars of Hercules and the Indus valley, between the Hallstatt era Celts in what is now southern Germany and eastern France and the legendary kingdom of Saba in southern Arabia. This includes the Achaemenid Persian Empire at its greatest extend during the reign of Dareios I., 522 – 486 BCE.  

 

The Roman Era Orient: Detailed map of Roman era Orient about 64 CE, depicting Roman Syria and the surrounding client states, the entire Parthian Empire, as well as the remaining states of western Asia together with the major trade routes over land and through the Indian ocean. An optimal supplement to our large Imperium Romanum map.

 

 

Now Available: Ancient Egypt in the New Kingdom Period

Sardis VerlagComment

Our newest large scale map Ancient Egypt in the New Kingdom period is now available from the Tabulae-Geographicae Shop!

This highly detailed and decorative huge wall map in 1:2.5 Mio. scale depicts the country and all its dependent territories during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II., the pinnacle of Egyptian power! An ancillary map in 1:10 Mio. shows Egypt's neighbors, the other great power of the time, rivals for the hegemony over the Levant. In addition, the design of our map makes it also possible to retrace the previous periods of the Old and Middle Kingdom, since Pyramids and other features from these periods are noted.

 

 

New Postcard: "The Parthian Empire"

Sardis VerlagComment

The little brother of our recently released map The Roman Era Orient is now available!

The map depicts the Parthian and Indo-Parthian Empires in the first half of the 1st century CE. The required scale of 1:25. Mio. is relatively large if compared to our other offers in the Ancient Empires series, as our postcards of the Roman or Persian Realms. Thus even on a small DIN A6 sized postcard we could include an astonishing number of details.

Features:

  • DIN A6 (148 x 105 cm),
  • Glossy finish,
  • Printed on 300 g/m² postcard chromo board,
  • Scale 1:25.000.000,
  • Legend in English and German,
  • The countries and vassal states of the Parthian Empire,
  • The most famous cities of the Empire and it's neighbours,
  • The most important peoples of the region,
  • Major routes through the Parthian realm.

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New Map: The Roman Era Orient

Sardis VerlagComment

Our newest map, The Roman Era Orient, continues what we started with our big Imperium Romanum map. To provide a complete coverage of the Greco-Roman world through highly detailed wall maps. This map depicts the lands east of the Roman Empire, as far as regular contact with the empire extended. Included are the Parthian Empire, Rome's eternal rival, as well as the kingdoms of India and the rising Kushan Empire, all of which were destinations for the merchants operating out of the Red Sea ports in Egypt's eastern desert.

To include the entire Parthian Empire, it became necessary to have significant overlap between both maps. We used this opportunity to show the Roman East at an earlier stage, before the annexations of client states and military expansion transformed it to the state depicted in our 211 CE map. We chose the year 64 CE, after the end of the Roman-Parthian war for the control of Armenia in 58-63 CE, and before the outbreak of the great Jewish revolt in 66 CE. After its end, the new emperor Vespasian began to reorganize the entire eastern frontier, starting the aforementioned transformation.

However, our new map is not strictly limited to 64 CE. Especially in the eastern part, in the Hindu Kush mountains and Indus valley, state entities developed very dynamically over the course of the 1st century CE. The relatively short-lived Indo-Sycthian rule was replaced by its equally short lived Indo-Parthian successor. Their realm soon fragmented and was reduced to their old heartland in modern Seistan by the rising power of the Kushans, who should dominate the area in the 2nd century CE.

To depict the major actors of the east during the entire duration of the principate, older and newer sites, including some phases of expansion of theses states, are shown as well.

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Canvas Prints Now Available Separately

Sardis VerlagComment

Individually manufactured prints of our products on canvas are now also available in rolled up form, without a stretcher frame.

The basic DIN A0 sized 300 dpi HD print uses 400 g/m² canvas and, unlike the stretcher frame version, it can be shipped globally. On demand we can add a few cm bleed around every edge for framing/stretching.

Each print is custom made. Nonetheless, you can order them conveniently from our web store interface.

Imperium Romanum Map now also Available as Folded Poster

Sardis VerlagComment

A new edition of our map of the Roman Empire is now available as a folded poster. Folded up, the size of the poster is reduced from DIN A0 to DIN A4, which is about the size of a regular book. It will be delivered in an attractive cardboard fold with product information and detail images on its back side. This edition is mainly intended for the international and retail market. Compared to the rolled up poster, which we continue to offer, there are two big advantages of this new product:

  • Inexpensive worldwide shipping
  • It can be easily sold in retail stores together with ordinarily-sized books without the need for an extra map stand an product info flyer.

Also note that, as a newly released edition of the poster, it also profits from the improved color scheme and the significantly enhanced and expanded content previously only found on our textile print of the Imperium Romanum map.

 

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New Postcards Available!

Sardis VerlagComment

Today, two more DIN A6 sized postcards have become available in our web shop. The first card, which we previewed last week, depicts the lands of modern Israel and its neighbors in the first decades of our era, while the second one displays our Southern Etruria and Latium Vetus map, that was first published as an ancillary map on our big poster The Achaemenid Empire and the West.

Postcard Iudaea: Map of ancient Judea and surrounding territories from the end of Herod Archelaus' reign to the first year of Emperor Claudius (6 – 41 CE).

Our map depicts the first phase of direct Roman rule in Judea. After king Herod died in 4 BCE, his realm was divided. The Greek cities of Hippos, Gadara and Gaza were detached from royal rule and became part of the province of Syria. Peraea and Galilee became a separate tetrarchy under Herod Antipas, while Philippos' tetrarchy included the outlying north eastern regions. The heartland of the kingdom was first under the reign of Herod Archelaus, who was already deposed by emperor Augustus in 6 CE. Subsequently, his territories became the Province Iudaea, governed by an equestrian prefect. More here.

Postcard Latium: Map of southern Etruria and ancient Latium in an era when the Etruscan civilization had reached its zenith and Rome flourished for a first time.

The map encompasses the Roman territory and its surroundings in the final years of the 6th century BCE. For a first time the Roman state gained control over the entire original region of Latium (Latium Vetus, a more limited area than later Roman and modern Latium) and a stretch of the coast down to Terracina. This first “Roman Empire” was only short lived. Already in the first decades of the 5th century BCE, the south was occupied by the Volsci, while in the East, the Latins became threatened by Aequi expansion. For the greatest part of this century, Rome had to defend itself in the Alban hills, while going through a phase of stagnation, internal strife and economic decline. It was only in the decades following the conquest of the neighboring Etruscan city Veii in 392 BCE (Livius, Dionysius) that the rise of Rome to ancient superpower status would truly begin.

Due to the later dominance of Rome, even this early era of Roman history is well covered by ancient sources. However, these accounts were all composed several centuries after the described events. The early historians of Rome and their Greek counterparts tried to reconstruct a coherent narrative of Rome's first centuries out of the evidence still available to them. For the modern historians, which have much less material to work with, it has become in many ways barely possible to judge the accuracy of their ancient predecessors.

Archeology too can only partially help to unravel the first centuries of the Roman state. Excavations did show that archaic Rome was a wealthy city state which could afford to construct numerous monumental public buildings. Its limits, however, are revealed if we look for the boundaries of Rome's power and its internal organization.

An important document to answer this question is the first treaty between Rome and Carthage, which was only passed to us in Greek translation by Polybios (Book 3.22), a historian writing in the mid 2nd century BCE. Polybios dates the treaty to the first years of the Republic, for many a doubtful date. A crucial argument for the authenticity of this document is Polybios' remark that the archaic Latin could barely be understood by contemporary Romans, which fits well into what we know of archaic Latin and its development in the first centuries of the Republic.

The boundaries of Roman hegemony, as described in the Roman-Carthaginian treaty, is practically identical to the image given by the ancient historians for the last years of the regal era and thus also how they are drawn on this map.

A Small Map of the First Province of Judea

Sardis VerlagComment

 

Today we proudly present our first new map of the new year. A small but quite detailed representation of the Roman province of Judea in the first decades of the 1st century CE. It will be published as a postcard shortly, making it the first product in a whole series of new products to be released in the next few months, including two completely new full-sized wall maps.

 

Under Roman rule, the entire region was thoroughly transformed. In addition to the various regime changes, this era brought the two Jewish Roman Wars, which lead to the destruction of the second temple and the expulsion of all Jews from the region around Jerusalem. In consequence, the primarily Jewish realm of King Herod the Great became the mainly pagan province of Syria Palaestina, as it is depicted on our big map of The Roman Empire in 211 CE.

After the collapse of the Seleucid Empire more than 100 years earlier, the mountains of Libanon, Antilibanon and Hermon (north of the area of Jewish settlement) had become a haven for robbers and home to numerous small independent states. It wasn't until the reign of Augustus, that order was largely restored. Many of these small states, such as the terarchy of Lysanias around the town of Abila, or Chalcis in Libanon, survived as Roman clients with changing rulers long into the Imperial era.

 

Our map depicts the first phase of direct Roman rule in Judea. After king Herod died in 4 BCE, his quite extensive realm was divided. The Greek cities of Hippos, Gadara and Gaza were detached from royal rule and became part of the province of Syria, which already included the highly Hellenized enclave of the other Decapolis cities. Herod's son Archelaos received the title of Ethnarch and the heartland of his father's kingdom to rule: Judea, Samaria and Idumaea. His brother Philippos became tetrarch of Gaulanitis, Batanaea, Trachonitits and Auranitis, while his brother Herod Antipas became tetrarch of Peraea and Galilee. Already in 6 CE Archelaos was disposed of by the Emperor and his territories become the Province Iudaea, governed by an equestrian prefect. The prefect had his seat in Caesarea Maritima (once founded by Herod) and was a subordinate to the Syrian governor in Antioch.

 

This arrangement survived for some decades until the death of Philippos in 33/34. During this epoch, the Tetrarchs founded the cities of Tiberias in Galilee, Iulias and Caesarea Philippi at the places of Bethsaida and Panias in lower Gaulanitis, as well as Iulias/Livias in Peraea.

After the death of Philippos, his tetrarchy became a part of Syria and was placed under direct Roman administration for a few years. But with the inauguration of the new Emperor Caligula, it was given to the grandson of Herod the Great, Herod Agrippa I. He later also received the former tetrarchy of Lysanias, the title of King, Herod Antipas' territories and, after playing his part in the ascension of the new Emperor Claudius, also the province of Iudaea. Thus, for a short time, almost all of his grandfathers' realm was united once again.

 

The Near East of this period was a landscape dominated by networks of many small and quite extensive villages, that took over the function that cities had elsewhere, as well as Greek city states.

The self-administrating city states were the basic units of the Roman Empire's and its Hellenistic predecessors organization. Since the age of Alexander the Great, over 300 years earlier, the new rulers of the Near East had either refounded the ancient cities of the region as Polises with Greek constitutions or promoted the foundation of new examples of this kind.

 

Especially, the territories of the old Phoenician coastal cities in some cases encompassed vast areas. Sidon and Damascus had a common border somewhere around Mt. Hermon and Augustus' new Colonia, the old Phoenician town of Berytus, included at least the northern part of the modern Bekaa Valley with the great sanctuary at Heliopolis.

 

Release: The Achaemenid Empire and the West

Sardis VerlagComment

Our newest large map of the ancient world is now available! The map encompasses the entire territory between the Pillars of Hercules and the Indus valley, between the Hallstatt era Celts in what is now southern Germany and eastern France and the legendary kingdom of Saba in southern Arabia. This includes the Achaemenid Persian Empire at its greatest extend during the reign of Dareios I., 522 – 486 BCE.  

Features:

  • The Ecumene, the world known for the ancient Greeks at the turn of the 6th to 5th century BCE
  • All great nations and cultures of their period,
  • The colonies of the Greeks and Phoenicans,
  • All countries of the Persian Empire with their respective capitals,
  • The territories of Herodot's 20 satrapies,
  • More than 800 settlements and sanctuaries,
  • More than 200 peoples and regions,
  • The persian royal road network,
  • Caravan and trade routes,
  • Major searoutes,
  • Detailed ancillary map for southern Eturia and old Latium during the first years of the Roman Republic.

The preceding 6th century BCE was an fascinating, incredible colorful era of development, change and progress. A time in which the stage for the classic ancient world of the next 1000 years was set. A world that still influences our present and we wanted to, or at least a small part of it, bring back to life with this map.

While the Roman Empire map displayed the Imperium at a fixed point in time, here we followed a broader approach. We wanted the map to represent the entire era and had to cope with less precis and plentiful source material. As orientation we used the long reign of Darius I. (522 to 486 BCE), when his Achaemenid Empire had reached its greatest extend.

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Preview: The Persian Empire and the Mediterranean World

Sardis VerlagComment

Our newest large map of the ancient world is almost completed and will be released during the course of autumn! However, we have yet to add some details and the layout isn't completely finalized either. Just like our map of the Roman Empire, it will first be available as a DIN A0 (1189 x 841 mm) sized poster.

The new map shows the Persian Empire and the Mediterranean world during the reign of King Dareios I. (522 – 486 BCE), when the power of the Achaemenids peaked.

Historical Map: The Rhineland 1794

Sardis VerlagComment

Our newest reprinted historical map is now available for purchase from our Webshop or Amazon.de

The map shows the territory along both banks of the Rhine between the old city of Worms and Rheindiebach in great detail. It includes the well known cities of Mainz, Wiesbaden and Darmstadt, as well as Frankenstein Castle. Frankfurt is just off the map's north eastern edge, but a considerable amount of its territory south of the river Main is still depicted. 

This highly accurate map originates from the initial stages of the French Revolutionary Wars. It was completed in 1794 and published as part of the collection Kriegs Theater der teutschen und franzoesischen Graenzlanden zwischen dem Rhein und der Mosel, im Jahr 1796 (Theatre of war in the French and German borderlands between the Rhine and the Moselle in the year 1796) by I. L. C. Rheinwald in Mannheim.

Our DIN A1 (59,4 x 84,1 cm) reprint almost exactly replicates the original's size of 80 x 60 cm².

Additional and larger images can be found on the corresponding product page.

MINI-Poster "The Odenwald region in 1736"

Sardis VerlagComment

Our reprint of the 1736 historic map of the Odenwald region is now also available as compact DIN A4 sized MINI-poster. Requiring just 1/8th of the space of the regular DIN A1 sized poster, it will fit into every collection.

Despite its small size the mini poster was only slightly scaled down from the original's 46 x 33 cm² to 29,7 x 21 cm². Of course all labels are still perfectly readable. It can be obtained from our web shop or will come as a free bonus with the map's large version.